China Threatens U.S. if Pre-Emptive Strike Against North Korea Occurs

by John Galt
August 10, 2017 21:45 ET

Nothing like watching a Chinese People’s Liberation Army hell march video to remind everyone that they have the largest military in the world. The superpower race has shifted thanks to globalist ambitions over the last forty years thanks to the major nuclear powers ceding the actual dying over to subsidiary client nations whether they wanted to fight for those powers or not.

Tonight in the Global Times of China, an official organ of the Chinese Communist Party, the following editorial appears which clearly outlines a threat to the United States should a pre-emptive strike occur:

Reckless game over the Korean Peninsula runs risk of real war

Source:Global Times Published: 2017/8/10 23:23:40

The US and North Korea have both ramped up their threatening rhetoric. The Pentagon has prepared plans for B-1B strategic bombers to make preemptive strikes on North Korea’s missile sites. US Secretary of Defense James Mattis issued an ultimatum to North Korea on Wednesday to “cease any consideration of actions that would lead to the end of its regime and destruction of its people.”

Meanwhile, North Korea issued plans to fire four intermediate-range missiles to land 30-40 kilometers from Guam and claimed it would finalize the plan by mid-August.

Some people in Guam have already expressed panic for the first time after the end of the Cold War. The US has already got the worst of the confrontation with North Korea.

Many people believe the possibility of war is very low. If war really breaks out, the US can hardly reap any strategic harvest and North Korea will face unprecedented risks. North Korea aims to propel the US to negotiate with it, while the US wants to put North Korea in check. Neither can achieve its goal, so they compete to escalate tensions, but neither wants to take the initiative to launch a war.

The real danger is that such a reckless game may lead to miscalculations and a strategic “war.” That is to say, neither Washington nor Pyongyang really wants war, but a war could break out anyway as they do not have the experience of putting such an extreme game under control.

In the near future, it would be highly sensitive if US B-1B fighter jets fly over the Korean Peninsula or North Korea launches missiles in the direction of Guam. Both sides would upgrade their alert to the highest level. The uncertainty in the Korean Peninsula is growing.

Beijing is not able to persuade Washington or Pyongyang to back down at this time. It needs to make clear its stance to all sides and make them understand that when their actions jeopardize China’s interests, China will respond with a firm hand.

China should also make clear that if North Korea launches missiles that threaten US soil first and the US retaliates, China will stay neutral. If the US and South Korea carry out strikes and try to overthrow the North Korean regime and change the political pattern of the Korean Peninsula, China will prevent them from doing so.

China opposes both nuclear proliferation and war in the Korean Peninsula. It will not encourage any side to stir up military conflict, and will firmly resist any side which wants to change the status quo of the areas where China’s interests are concerned. It is hoped that both Washington and Pyongyang can exercise restraint. The Korean Peninsula is where the strategic interests of all sides converge, and no side should try to be the absolute dominator of the region.

While this seems like another vacuous threat, the truth is that China does hold our economic lifeline with a pathetically weak thread around our neck. Should President Trump order a first or pre-emptive strike on North Korea, the Chinese have the option of a total trade embargo against the U.S. which would paralyze the American economy in less than a week. Add in the fact that a freeze of U.S. assets in China would probably imperil our banking system and that could really be far worse than a small 10 Kt atomic weapon exploding over U.S. territory.

Should the U.S. back down now? Obviously the answer is no, or we will look weak, vacillating, and exploitable as we did under Obama or the British under Chamberlain.

However, President Trump should consider this editorial and the intelligence community’s warnings about what will happen in response to an attack on North Korea before proceeding forward with any course of action unless a threat to the U.S. or our allies in the region occur.

  • tom

    Should N.Korea conduct any more missile tests, we should immediately take out any launched missile with THAAD or other systems we have. We should then destroy the launch sites with Tomahawks. We cannot take the chance that a perceived “missile test” isn’t actually an attack

  • Coldsteel1983

    I think that a response to Chinese economic warfare would be a quick move to cut off or greatly reduce the flows of oil, raw materials and food into China.

    Which, while probably our only realistic recourse puts us on a collision course similar to that which we had with Japan before WWII.

    Jeff B.

    • There is no “win” in this situation thus the stalemate.

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